nutrition for brides

5 Foods I'm LOVING Right Now

1. Kombucha

To be completely honest I never really liked kombucha. I would try it on occasion because it was trendy and cool and probiotics and such, but it was always too sweet for me. Recently, a fellow RD suggested we meet and chat over a glass of kombucha at our local kombucha bar, Dean's Zesty Booch. If you live in Bozeman and have not been to Dean's bar- what are you waiting for?! Seriously. It's so good. In a town that's so saturated with breweries, what an amazing idea to have a bar that serves healthier beverages. I love it.

Like I said, I'd never really been a fan, but now I'm hooked. I'm also loving Healthade, its not too sweet, not too sour, and good for your gut! Their motto is Follow Your Gut, which I love! Healthade is available at most grocery stores, but you can double check here (keep an eye out at your local stores- my store isn't listed in their directory). 

2. Hemp Seeds

Seriously loving these too. Mostly on the usual smoothies, oatmeal, & yogurt, but also on salads, mixed dinner bowls, veggie sides, pizzas- can't go wrong.

Hemp seeds are another trendy seed, but I didn't actually try them until I went to FNCE (Food & Nutrition Conference & Exp0) last fall. These little guys are a great source of energy and are PACKED with nutrients - they're HIGH in protein, magnesium, manganese, iron, zinc, phosphorus, and B vitamins. 

3. Buckwheat

Buckwheat has a wonderfully earthy, nutty flavor. I made some homemade granola back in December to give as Christmas gifts, luckily I made enough for myself to last awhile too. It adds an amazing nutty crunch to homemade granola. You could also toast it in the oven and add it to your favorite store bought granola.

I've also had it as a breakfast porridge - its a little mushier and creamier than oatmeal but goes great with all the same toppings, plus it has that yummy nutty taste.

4. siggi's protein bites

I made these a few weeks back and have been keeping them in my freezer ever since. I've been loving them for a quick snack to grab on the go. I'm the kind of person that gets hungry every few hours so it's important to keep healthy snacks on hand (this usually prevents me from eating peanut butter by the spoonful - although nothing wrong with that). Loaded with protein (nuts, seeds, & skyr), these bites are super filling and have just the right amount of sweetness. You can find the recipe here.

5. Tempeh

Similar to tofu but more of a nutty and rough texture. I highly recommend it baked or sauteed for your plant based meals. I don't eat much meat with for the purpose of incorporating more veggies into my diet as well as the 1,000s of health benefits associated with a plant-based diet. I'm a flexitarian mainly because I don't believe in restrictions, I occasionally crave a quality burger, and most people in my life eat a very meat-centric diet. Anyways, tempeh is awesome and a great source of protein, calcium, iron, and more for those of us that primarily eat plants. I just made this recipe from Nutrition Stripped. Give it a try!

 

What foods are you loving right now?

 

 

*Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. By clicking on the Amazon links, I do receive a small percentage of the sale. I link to products products I truly support and recommend.

What is 'Healthy'?

 
(This is the first pic that showed up when I typed 'healthy' into the stock photos site - I thought it was general, but fitting. Happiness can play a role in your healthy too, can't it?)

(This is the first pic that showed up when I typed 'healthy' into the stock photos site - I thought it was general, but fitting. Happiness can play a role in your healthy too, can't it?)

 

 

Everyone seems to have a different definition of 'healthy.' Which I think is great. There is no one definition and it is totally personal to your beliefs, health needs, lifestyle, and more. 

My healthy is a lot of different things. It means having the energy to do the things I love; being mindful and doing my best to listen to my hunger and fullness cues; choosing foods that make my body feel good most often; including lots of veggies; getting a good night's sleep on most nights; being active but choosing the types of activities I enjoy; being flexible around food and not having restrictions or labeling foods as 'good' or 'bad'; allowing myself to have chocolate or cookies or beer or fries if I want to.

I'm sure most people I see at my local co-op would include  'local' and 'organic' in their definition, while some of my patients at the hospital may include low saturated fat and sodium, and those with celiac may include gluten-free in their definition. I think this is great, and goes to show that there is no one perfect 'diet' or way of eating. Each person is unique and so are their health and nutrition needs.

 

 

You may or may not know that many of the food claims we read on food packages are regulated and defined by the FDA or USDA ('low-sodium', 'good source of', 'light' or 'lite', 'natural', 'organic', etc.)

In 2015, KIND bars were called out for labeling their bars as 'healthy.' Although they're made up of most poly and monounsaturated fats, the total fat content in the bars exceeded the amount allowed by the government's definition.

'Healthy' was originally defined back in the 90s when we all feared fat. Now that we know how essential fat is to our brain and body functions, and that different types of fat act differently in the body, we're taking another look at the word (20 years later!).

 

So, my question for you is...

How do you define 'healthy'? What does 'healthy' mean to you?

Is it based on certain nutrients or food groups? Does it have rules and regulations? Does it include exercise, movement, a good night's sleep? Is it your relationship with food? Let me know!

 

(btw...healthy can now be used on food labels if the fat content is primarily composed of mono and polyunsaturated fats or if the product contains at least 10% of the recommended daily value of either potassium or vitamin D)

Homemade Applesauce

applesauce-edit.jpg

Did you know over 2,000 varieties of apples grow in the US? They're probably one of my favorite fruits, especially this time of year. I know there's so many choices to choose from but I'm pretty traditional and I think just the classic macintosh are my favorite! What's your fave?

Apples are a filling and healthy snack on their own (or with peanut butter), but one of my favorite fall snacks is homemade applesauce. You could also eat this as a healthy dessert, mix it with oatmeal, serve as a side with dinner, on pork, etc.- get creative!

Homemade applesauce is so much more flavorful and satisfying than store bought, besides, it doesn't get easier than this...

 

Ingredients
4 apples any kind, cored and diced
~1 Tbsp cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
1/4 - 1/2 cup water
(I've noticed that the amounts seem to vary depending on the ripeness of the apples, adjust to consistency and taste)

Directions
1. LEAVE THE SKINS ON THE APPLES! They give the applesauce a nice pink color and they're a great source of fiber.
2. Heat the apple chunks and a 1/4 cup water in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat.
3. Simmer until the apples are soft and easy to mash with a potato masher. The time it takes likely depends on the type of apple, but it should about 10 minutes or so.
4. Add the cinnamon. You may need to add more water as well, if the apples are sticking to the pan. You can adjust the water as needed to reach your desired consistency.
5. Mash the apples to the texture you like (leave some chunks if you like!). You could also use an immersion blender or regular stand up blender to puree the sauce until smooth (If you used a cinnamon stick, remove it before blending).